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Takom – 1/35 AK-130 Russian Navy 130mm Automatic Naval Gun – Full Build

Kit Number:
2129
Scale:
1:35
Published:
Saturday, June 6, 2020
Manufacturer:
TAKOM
Retail Price:
$75
Reviewed By:
James Wechsler

1/35 AK-130 Russian Navy 130mm Automatic Naval Gun – Full Build

By  Takom

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This is the full build follow up review to the first look review of this subject that can be found here: http://www.amps-armor.org/SiteReviews/ShowReview.aspx?id=14533

First Look

Before I dive into the construction of this kit, I must apologize.  I had a computer glitch and lost a few of the in-progress photos.  I’ve replaced them with pictures of the finished model that show the items I was intending so hopefully it’s still clear.

Construction

The first steps in construction are for the large round base.  There’s a almost circular shield that goes around it and the kit provides this in five segments.  There are a number of pin marks on the outward facing part of each segment that need cleaning up.  But, you should first test fit the large cross braces since they cover a lot of the pin marks.

Once they are cleaned up and the braces installed, I glued all five segments together before adding the remaining smaller parts.  I did this because I could tell that there was going to be a significant amount of putty and sanding required so it’s best to not have small and fragile parts installed.

Once the segments were installed, I test fitted it to the base and noticed that the curvature of the shield is notable larger in diameter that where it is to be positioned on the base.  So I carefully bent the shield by hand to decrease the radius enough for it to fit.  After test fitting, I removed the shield from the base since the base is mostly a hull red color and the shield is mostly grey with just the lower 1/3 of the outward face being red with a white band and the rest being grey.  It would be very hard to paint with the whole thing glued together.

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Then I installed the remaining small parts and the hand rail that wraps around the outside of the shield.  Here I ran into a serious problem.  It seems that Takom had a design error and a segment of the handrail doesn’t match the one next to it.  It’s about 2 inches too short!

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To fix this I trimmed the parts to the nearest support brace and then curved a piece of 0.025 inch plastic rod to match the curvature and then cut it to the right length.  Not too hard a fix.

With the base now complete I turned to the gun mounts and elevation segments.  These steps are very straight forward with only a seam between the halves of the rotation section to be puttied and filled.  For the most part I followed the instructions but I left off the small ladder rungs in Steps 6c and d since I thought it best to mount the large housing first in case any filling and sanding was needed.

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The next task I did was to mount the large ball shaped housing.  Which isn’t called for until step 9 but again, I wanted to leave off all of the ladder rungs and miscellaneous railings until the big housing was completely mounted. Overall, the fit is quite good with just a little putty being needed at the contact points.  Once mounted, I noticed that there are a lot of slide molding seams to be cleaned up.  Not difficult but definitely the kind of thing to do when nothing fragile is mounted.

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The next series of steps 8 – 10 are to mount all of the doors, ladder rungs, railings, and other smaller parts.  This is straight forward enough.  However, I would recommend leaving off the ladders in step 10 until all painting and weathering is completed.  Once they are installed, there’s no simple way to set to the whole assembly down.

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Lastly, I assembled the cannons.  Pretty straight forward stuff and the fit of the two cannon halves is pretty good so just a little putty and sanding is needed.  I left them separate for painting since they just slip in place anyway.

 

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Painting

Painting begins with the red on the base and the shield.  After I painted it all a flat white, I used a Model Master enamel color called British Crimson for the red.  It’s a good match and I already had it.  The kits has call outs for Mig AMMO colors which would be a good choice but I just didn’t have them.  Then I sprayed another layer of flat white and painted the band around the top of the red on the shield.

Once masked, I turned to the gray.  Takom presents two choices- a medium grey and a darker grey.  This is based on the warship that is being represented.  I chose the darker grey since I knew I wanted to weather it quite a bit.  For this I chose Tamiya Neutral Grey followed by a panel fade of Neutral Grey lighted with white.

After that I turned to the weathering.  First I used some very thinned Tamiya buff to give an even more faded look.  I went back with thinned Tamiya Flat Earth around the corners, weld lines, etc. to give the impression of aging.  This sealed up with a flat coat.

I added an oil wash of thinned Windsor Newton Raw Umber to blend it all together.  I made sure to drag a wide brush from top to bottom of give a little streaking effect.  I continued the weathering by using more Raw Umber applied with a small brush to highlight the mounting points of the ladder rungs, railings, etc.  Finally, I added some stronger streaks using Raw Umber, Burnt Umber and Black oils.

After another flat coat, I finished the weathering by dry brushing with some flat black in areas that would see high wear like the ladder rungs, eyelets, etc.

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Conclusion

Overall this is a nice model of a very unusual and interesting subject.  Of course there is the one error, but otherwise the model is well designed with pretty good fit for such a large model of an unusual shape.

Highly Recommended.

My sincere thanks to Takom for the review sample.

Reviewed by Jim Wechsler, SoCal AMPS

 

 

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